the classic cocktails

I have compiled, from the UK Bartenders Guild, a list of some of the most popular classic cocktails in an effort to research what are traditional liquor combinations. We will not however have a set of pre-determined cocktails that the the piano will make, everything will be left up to chance and improvisation. The results should be unpredictable and the cocktail combinations should be limitless.

1. B & B

* 3cl brandy
* 3cl Bénédictine

Pour the brandy directly into a brandy balloon and gently float the Bénédictine over a barspoon to lay on top.

2. Bacardi Classic

* 5cl Bacardi white rum
* 3cl fresh lime juice
* 1teaspoon grenadine

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry on a cocktail stick across the glass.

3. Bentley

* 5cl applejack brandy
* 5cl Dubonnet

Pour the brandy and Dubonnet into a mixing glass with ice. Stir. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a twist of orange.

4. Between the Sheets

* 3cl brandy
* 3cl Cointreau
* 3cl light rum
* dash fresh lemon juice

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass.

5. Bosom Caresser

A 1920s classic first made by Harry Craddock at the American Bar in London ‘s Savoy Hotel.

* 4cl brandy
* 2cl orange curaçao
* dash grenadine
* 1 free-range egg yolk

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail or small wine glass.

6. Brandy Alexander

* 3cl brandy
* 3cl brown crème de cacao
* 3cl double cream

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a sprinkle of freshly grated nutmeg.

7. Brandy Cocktail

A 1920s classic drink. The original recipe did not use Angostura bitters.

* 5cl brandy
* 2 dashes orange curaçao
* 2 dashes Angostura bitters

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass with ice. Stir. Strain into a balloon glass.

8. Bronx

* 3cl gin
* 1.5cl dry vermouth
* 1.5cl sweet vermouth
* 3cl fresh orange juice

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a twist of orange.

9. Buck’s Fizz

Mr. McGarry of Buck’s Club, in London , created this in 1921. The ratio is two-thirds champagne/one-third juice.

* fresh orange juice
* brut champagne

Fill a quarter of a champagne flute with fresh orange juice. Top up with champagne. Stir gently.

10. Collins

Usually a summer drink, a Collins is made with lots of ice in a highball. The original Collins cocktail was a John Collins, and its origin can be traced back to John Collins, the headwaiter at a hotel and coffeehouse named Limmer’s, in London, around 1790 to 1817. His original version used genever, a Dutch-style gin, soda water, lemon, and sugar. It wasn’t until the 1880s that the drink found popularity in the United States -it was viewed as an upscale gin sling.

* 5cl gin
* 2cl fresh lemon juice
* 2 dashes gomme syrup
* soda water

Add the lemon juice, gomme syrup, and gin to a highball filled with ice. Top up with soda. Stir. Drop a slice of lemon in the drink. Serve with a stirrer

11. Cosmopolitan

The original recipe used vodka, Cointreau, and cranberry juice. Using lime juice binds the ingredients together and gives it a more refreshing taste.

* 5cl vodka
* 1/3oz/1cl Cointreau
* 1/3oz/1cl cranberry juice
* 1/3oz/1cl fresh lime juice

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a wedge of lime.

12. Daiquiri

* 5cl white rum
* 2cl fresh lime juice
* 2 to 3 dashes gomme syrup

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a wedge of lime.

13. French 75

A creation from Henry of Henry’s Bar in Paris to celebrate the fire power of the famous French 75 light field gun used in the First World War. Originally called the “75 Cocktail.”

* 2cl gin
* 2cl fresh lemon juice
* dash gomme syrup
* champagne

Pour all the ingredients, except champagne, into a shaker. Shake. Strain into a champagne flute. Top up with champagne. Stir.

14. Long Island Iced Tea

This is the drink that guarantees you will have a hangover the next day. Extremely alcoholic, it makes you tipsy quickly. Dating from the Prohibition era, this long cocktail was originally made with any available spirit, hence there are many different recipes around today. Basically, it was made with five spirits: light rum, vodka, gin, tequila, and Cointreau.

* 1cl light rum
* 1cl vodka
* 1cl gin
* 1cl tequila
* 1cl Cointreau
* 2cl fresh lime juice
* cola, chilled

Pour all ingredients, except cola, into a highball filled with ice. Stir. Top up with chilled cola. Garnish with a wedge of lime. Serve with a straw and a stirrer.

15. Mai Tai

* 2cl dark rum
* 2cl golden rum
* 1cl triple sec/Cointreau
* 1cl Orgeat (almond syrup)
* 2cl fresh lime juice
* 3 dashes grenadine

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a goblet. Garnish with a tropical orchid or a wedge of lime. Serve with a straw and a stirrer.

16. Manhattan

* 6cl Canadian Club whisky
* 3cl sweet vermouth
* dash Angostura bitters

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass. Stir. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

17. Margarita

* 3cl silver tequila
* 3cl fresh lime juice
* 2cl Cointreau

Rub a wedge of lime around the rim of a Margarita glass. Dip it into a saucer of fine salt. Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into the glass. Garnish with a wedge of lime.

18. Martinez

* 3cl gin
* 3cl dry vermouth
* 2cl maraschino liqueur
* 2 dashes orange bitters

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon.

19. The Martini

* Keep the gin in the freezer, and put the glasses in the freezer to chill. A great Martini is one that stays very cold for as long as you drink it.
* 9cl gin
* 1 to 2 drops extra dry vermouth

Take the chilled cocktail glass from the freezer, handling it by the stem only. Pour the chilled gin directly into the glass. Fill a clean Angostura bitters bottle with dry vermouth so that you can shake a few drops of vermouth through its pourer into the gin. Float two to three drops of vermouth over the top of the drink. Cut a thin twist of lemon, then face the twist upside down over the glass and twist it to drop a few tears of juice in the drink. Rub the twist around the rim for the final touch. An olive is optional.

20. Mimosa

A classic cocktail from 1925, created at the Ritz Hotel in Paris, it is named after the tropical flowering shrub.

* 2oz/6cl fresh orange juice
* 2 dashes Grand Marnier
* champagne

Fill a champagne flute to one quarter with orange juice. Add the Grand Marnier. Top up with champagne. Stir.

21. Mint Julep

The drink’s name is derived from an Arabic word translated as “julab,” meaning “rose water.” The bourbon-based cocktail possibly originates from Virginia.

* 5cl bourbon
* bunch fresh mint leaves
* 1 teaspoon caster sugar
* 1 tablespoon cold water
* soda water

Place the mint in an old-fashioned glass. Add the sugar and water. Muddle until the sugar is dissolved. Add the bourbon. Fill the glass with crushed ice. Stir. Garnish with a sprig of mint. Serve with a straw and a stirrer.

22. Mojito

This is a classic Cuban cocktail, revived during the Prohibition era. The Bodeguita del Medio Bar in Havana is famous for its Mojitos.

* 5cl white rum
* 1 teaspoon caster sugar
* 2cl fresh lime juice
* bunch fresh mint on the stem
* sparking water

Put the sugar and lime juice in the bottom of a highball with a thick base. Add the mint leaves and muddle with the end of a barspoon or a wooden muddler. This releases the essence from the mint. Add the rum and fill the glass with crushed ice. Top up with sparkling water. Stir. Serve with a stirrer.

23. Moscow Mule

This 1940s cocktail was the marketing idea of John G. Martin, who worked for Heublein & Co., a spirits distributor.

* 5cl vodka
* 1cl fresh lime juice
* ginger beer

Pour the vodka and the lime juice into a highball filled with ice. Top up with ginger beer. Stir. Garnish with a wedge of lime in the drink. Serve with a stirrer.

24. Pimm’s No. 1 Cup

Created in 1840 as a digestive tonic by James Pimm and served at his Oyster Bar in London’s financial district, this concoction of herbs and quinine caught on. By the 1920s, Pimm’s No. 1 was distributed throughout England and exported to the Colonies. After the Second World War, the Pimm’s company introduced Pimm’s No. 2 with Scotch as a base, No. 3 with brandy, No. 4 with rum, and No. 5 with rye whiskey as a base. No. 6 had a vodka base.

* 5cl Pimm’s No. 1 Cup
* lemonade or ginger ale
* few slices lemon
* few slices orange
* few strips cucumber peel
* sprig fresh mint

Pour the Pimm’s into a highball filled with ice. Top up with 7Up or ginger ale. Add the fruit and stir. Garnish with a slice of lemon and orange, the peel of a cucumber, and a sprig of fresh mint in the glass. Serve with a straw.

25. Piña Colada

The most infamous of the coladas is the Piña Colada-its title means “strained pineapple.” This exotic number originated in Puerto Rico.

* 5cl white rum
* 10cl pineapple juice
* 5cl coconut cream
* crushed ice

Pour the pineapple juice into the blender. Add the coconut cream and the rum. Blend. Add the crushed ice and blend. Pour into a colada glass. Garnish with a wedge of pineapple and a maraschino cherry. Serve with a straw.

26. Old-Fashioned

Colonel James E. Pepper, a Kentucky-based bourbon distiller, and the bartender of the Pendennis Club in Louisville, were jointly responsible for the creation of this cocktail around 1900. Once called a “palate-paralyzer,” this cocktail has a song in its honor, Make It Another Old-Fashioned, Please, by lyricist Cole Porter.

* 5cl bourbon
* dash Angostura bitters
* 1 sugar cube
* soda water

Place a sugar cube in an old-fashioned glass and soak with Angostura. Add a dash of soda, just enough to cover the cube, and crush it with the back of a barspoon. Add the bourbon, then top up with soda. Stir. Garnish with a slice of orange and a maraschino cherry. Drop a twist of lemon in the drink.

27. Pink Gin

Angostura bitters was perfected as a remedy for stomach complaints by Dr. Johann Siegert, a surgeon for the Prussian army at the Battle of Waterloo, for a military hospital at Angostura, on the Orinoco River, in Venezuela. He named it after the town. Word of this herbal, plant-based remedy reached officers in the British Navy, who added it to the officers’ medicine kit and their Plymouth gin rations. Hence, the spread in the upper echelons of the drink, “Pink Gin.” Some prefer their Pink Gin cocktail with a splash of iced water; others like it straight. Always serve it ice cold.

* 5cl gin
* 2 dashes Angostura bitters

Pour the gin and bitters into a mixing glass with ice. Stir with a barspoon. Strain into a cocktail glass.

28. Pisco Sour

Pisco is a South American brandy, distilled from Muscat grapes and matured in clay jars. It is named after the town of Pisco in Peru. It is drunk in small bars and cafés throughout Peru, Argentina, and South America. The egg white binds together all ingredients.

* 5cl pisco
* 2cl fresh lime juice
* dash eggwhite
* 2 dashes Angostura bitters
* dash gomme syrup

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a wedge of lime.

29. Pousse-Café

This is always served after dinner, and each liqueur has a different density, allowing one to sit on top of another. Syrups are heavier than liqueurs, and spirits are even lighter. Pour the heaviest ingredient first, usually the first one listed. You can use any combination to make a pousse-café. This is the accepted classic recipe.

* 1cl grenadine
* 1cl green crème de menthe
* 1cl Galliano
* 1cl kummel
* 1cl brandy

Pour the grenadine into a shot glass as a base. Over the back of a barspoon, gently add the crème de menthe. Pause, add the Galliano the same way. Pause, add the kummel and, finally, the brandy. Serve carefully.

30. Ramos Fizz

In 1888, Henrico C. Ramos bought the Imperial Cabinet Saloon, New Orleans, where he created this cocktail. The recipe was a secret until the saloon closed at the start of Prohibition. Henrico’s brother, Charles Henry Ramos, gave the recipe to the world.

* 5cl gin
* 1cl fresh lime juice
* 1cl fresh lemon juice
* 3 dashes orange flower water
* 1 teaspoon eggwhite
* 5cl double cream
* 1 teaspoon caster sugar
* soda water

Pour all ingredients, except soda, into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into an old-fashioned glass filled with ice. Top up with soda. Garnish with a wedge of lime.

31. Rattlesnake

* 2cl Kahlua
* 2cl white crème de cacao
* 2cl Irish cream liqueur

Pour each ingredient, in the order listed, over the back of a barspoon into a shot glass.

32. Rusty Nail

A classic cocktail with orange and honey flavors.

* 6cl Scotch
* 3cl Drambuie

Pour the Scotch into an old-fashioned glass with ice. Add the Drambuie and stir. Garnish with a twist of lemon.

33. Sazerac

This cocktail made its film debut in the James Bond movie Live and Let Die. Its story, however, begins in New Orleans. In the early 1800s, Antoine Peychaud created it in the French Quarter, and named it for his favorite cognac, Sazerac-de-Forge et fils. In 1870, the cocktail was changed when American rye whiskey was substituted for the cognac. A dash of absinthe was also added by Leon Lamothe, a bartender. Today, he is regarded as the originator of the drink we now sip. In 1912, absinthe was banned, so Pernod is used instead.

* 5cl bourbon
* 1cl Pernod
* dash Peychaud bitters
* dash Angostura bitters
* 1 white sugar cube
* dash soda water

Place a sugar cube in an old-fashioned glass and soak with the Angostura and Peychaud bitters. Add enough soda to cover the sugar and crush it with the back of a barspoon. Add the bourbon. Stir. Float the Pernod over the top. Garnish with a twist of lemon.

34. Sidecar

Created by bartender Harry at Harry’s New York Bar in Paris during the First World War and named after a motorcycle sidecar in which an army captain was chauffeur-driven to and from the bar. The name of this captain remains elusive, but one thing is for sure: The proportions of this cocktail are firmly laid down-two measures strong, one measure sweet, and one measure sour. The cocktail glass must be ice cold; a sugar-coated rim is optional.

* 3cl brandy
* 2cl Cointreau
* 2cl fresh lemon juice

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

35. Singapore Sling

By definition, a sling can be traced back to 1759, and its name is possibly derived from the German word schlingen, meaning to swallow quickly. Its origin is uncertain and there might be a connection to the Collins. Most give credence to the legend that the Singapore Gin Sling was created at the Raffles Hotel, in Singapore, in 1915 by bartender Ngiam Tong Boon. By 1930, when the name Singapore Sling arrived in Europe and the United States, it had lost its fruit juices and was distilled down to gin, cherry brandy, fresh lemon juice, and soda.

Raffles Singapore Sling

* 2cl gin
* 2cl cherry brandy
* 1cl Coi ntreau
* 1cl Bénédictine
* 1cl fresh lime juice
* 7cl fresh orange juice
* 7cl pineapple juice

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a highball filled with ice. Garnish with a slice of pineapple and a maraschino cherry. Serve with a straw and a stirrer.
Singapore Sling

* 4cl gin
* 2cl cherry brandy
* 2cl fresh lemon juice
* soda water

Place all ingredients, except soda, into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a highball filled with ice. Top up with soda. Stir. Garnish with a slice of lemon and a maraschino cherry.

36. Stinger

Usually served straight-up in pre-Prohibition days, most people request it on the rocks in an old-fashioned glass.

* 5cl brandy
* 2cl white crème de menthe

Pour the brandy, then the crème de menthe, over ice in an old-fashioned glass. Stir. Serve with a stirrer and a glass of ice water on the side.

37. Tequila Sunrise

A Mexican concoction created in the late 1920s, this colorful long drink has maintained a certain chic. The trick for a successful two-tone drink is to add the grenadine slowly so it settles on the bottom of the glass, creating the sunrise effect.

* 5cl tequila
* 15cl fresh orange juice
* 2 dashes grenadine

Pour the tequila and orange juice into the highball filled with ice. Stir. Add the grenadine slowly and watch it trickle down through the drink. Stir just before drinking to create a fabulous sunrise effect. Garnish with a slice of orange in a spiral. Serve with a straw and a stirrer.

38. Tom and Jerry

A hot drink invented by “Professor” Jerry Thomas in 1852 at the Planter’s House Bar, St Louis, Missouri. He refused to serve it before snowfall.

* 1 free-range egg
* 4cl dark rum
* 1.5cl brandy
* 1 teaspoon caster sugar

Beat the egg yolk and the egg white separately, then combine in a heatproof toddy glass. Add the spirits and sugar. Fill with boiling water. Grate fresh nutmeg over the drink.

39. Vampiro

It’s a strange combination of orange and tomato juice, all the spices, the sweetness of the honey, and the surprise of onion.

* 5cl silver tequila
* 7cl tomato juice
* 3cl fresh orange juice
* 1 teaspoon clear honey
* 1cl fresh lime juice
* half slice onion, finely chopped
* few slices fresh red hot chili
* few drops Worcestershire sauce
* salt

Pour all ingredients, starting with the juices and then the tequila, into a shaker with ice. Shake well to release the flavor of the chili. Strain into a highball filled with ice. Garnish with a wedge of lime on the rim of the glass and a chili (green or red) for anyone devilish enough to dare to take a bite of it!

40. Vesper

This is the cocktail that James Bond ordered in the movie, Casino Royale, in memory of double agent Vesper Lynd, whose demise he mourned.

* 6cl gin
* 3cl vodka
* 1cl Lillet

Pour all ingredients into a shaker with ice. Shake. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a twist of orange.

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